Committee on the Rights of the Child, session 10 (1995)

Recommendations/observations on corporal punishment in the Committee on the Rights of the Child's concluding observations to states examined in the 10th session

Germany

(27 November 1995, CRC/C/15/Add.43, Concluding observations on initial report, para. 30)

"…The Committee encourages the State party to pursue its efforts towards changing attitudes with a view to eradicating all forms of violence against children, including the use of corporal punishment within the family. In this regard, it further encourages that, in the ongoing process of reform of the Civil Code, consideration be given to the incorporation of an absolute ban on corporal punishment."

Italy

(27 November 1995, CRC/C/15/Add.41, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 12 and 20)

"The Committee is preoccupied by the existence of child abuse, including physical and sexual abuse and violence within the family, and the insufficient protection afforded by the Penal Code in this regard, as well as the lack of adequate measures for the psycho-social recovery of child victims of such abuses....

"The Committee also suggests that the clear prevention and prohibition of torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, as well as a ban on corporal punishment within the family, be reflected in the national legislation."

Portugal

(27 November 1995, CRC/C/15/Add.45, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 15 and 23)

"The Committee is worried about the insufficient measures adopted to prevent and fight abuse and corporal punishment, in particular within the family....

"The Committee recommends that the authorities take the necessary measures, including the implementation of a national policy, to prevent abuse and corporal punishment of children, including within the family."

Senegal

(27 November 1995, CRC/C/15/Add.44, Concluding observations on initial report, para. 24)

"The Committee recommends that the State party ensure that national legislation conforms fully to the provisions and principles of the Convention, in the light of the concerns identified by the Committee and of the study on a comprehensive law reform conducted under the auspices of UNICEF. The principles of the Convention including those relating to the best interests of the child and the prohibition of discrimination and of participation of children in matters affecting them should be reflected in domestic law. Specific provisions should be included with a view to clearly forbidding female genital mutilation and any form of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, as well as any form of corporal punishment within the family. Adequate legislative and other measures should also be taken to establish a complaints procedure for children whose fundamental rights have been violated."

Ukraine

(27 November 1995, CRC/C/15/Add.42, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 14 and 29)

"The Committee regrets that appropriate measures have not yet been taken to effectively prevent and combat ill-treatment of children in schools or in institutions where children may be placed. The Committee is also preoccupied by the existence on a large scale of child abuse and violence within the family and the insufficient protection afforded by the existing legislation and services in that regard. The problem of sexual exploitation of children also requires special attention....

"The Committee further suggests that the clear prohibition of torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, as well as a ban on corporal punishment in the family, be reflected in the national legislation. The Committee also suggests the development of procedures and mechanisms to monitor complaints of maltreatment and cruelty within or outside the family…."

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