Committee on the Rights of the Child, session 14 (1997)

Recommendations/observations on corporal punishment in the Committee on the Rights of the Child's concluding observations to states examined in the 14th session

Bulgaria

(24 January 1997, CRC/C/15/Add.66, Concluding observations on initial report, para. 30)

"In the light of articles 19, 34 and 37 (a), the Committee strongly recommends that the State party take all appropriate measures to prevent and combat corporal punishment, sexual abuse and exploitation and ill-treatment of children, including in institutions and in detention centres. The Committee suggests that corporal punishment be prohibited by civil legislation and that appropriate legal measures be taken to combat sexual abuse and exploitation of children…."

Ethiopia

(24 January 1997, CRC/C/15/Add.67, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 13 and 27)

"The Committee notes with concern the non-compatibility of certain provisions of domestic law with the principles and rights enshrined in the Convention, such as the provision for a different minimum age of marriage between girls (15 years of age) and boys (18 years of age), the provision in the Penal Code for the possibility to sentence children to corporal punishment, the provision in the Civil Code for ‘light bodily punishment’ as an educative measure within the family and the limitation of the right to counsel when the child may be represented by his or her parents or legal guardian during legal proceedings.

"The Committee recommends that the Government pursue the process of bringing existing legislation into line with the provisions of the Convention and that the best interests of the child be fully taken into account in the drafting of new legislation. In this regard, the Committee particularly recommends that the provisions for the minimum age of marriage for girls at 15 years, the sentencing of children to corporal punishment, the ‘light bodily punishment’ as an educational measure within the family, and the limitation of the right to legal counsel of children be abolished as a matter of priority."

Myanmar

(24 January 1997, CRC/C/15/Add.69, Concluding observations on initial report, para. 28)

"The Committee recommends that the State party undertake a comprehensive review of the national legislation to bring it into conformity with the principles and provisions of the Convention, especially in the areas of non-discrimination, citizenship, freedom of association, corporal punishment, child labour, adoption and the administration of juvenile justice. The Committee also recommends that the Citizenship Act, the Village and Towns Acts and the Whipping Acts be repealed…."

New Zealand

(24 January 1997, CRC/C/15/Add.71, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 16 and 29)

"The Committee expresses its concern at the authorization provided by section 59 of the Crimes Act to use physical force against children as punishment within the family, provided that the force is reasonable in the circumstances. Moreover, the Committee notes the insufficient measures taken to address the issue of illtreatment and abuse, including sexual abuse, within the family, as well as issues of physical and psychological recovery and social reintegration of children victims of such ill-treatment or abuse.

"The Committee recommends that the State party review legislation with regard to corporal punishment of children within the family in order to effectively ban all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse. It further recommends that appropriate mechanisms be established to ensure the physical and psychological recovery and social reintegration of children victims of such ill-treatment and abuse, in the light of article 39 of the Convention."

Panama

(24 January 1997, CRC/C/15/Add.68, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 16 and 30)

"The Committee is concerned by the persistence of violence against children within the family, including the use of corporal punishment. In the light of article 17 of the Convention, the Committee is also concerned about the need for further measures to protect children from media information and material injurious to their wellbeing.

"The Committee recommends that effective public awareness campaigns be developed and that measures be adopted by the State party to provide appropriate assistance to the family in the performance of its child-rearing responsibilities, including parental guidance and counselling, with a view, inter alia, to preventing domestic violence and to prohibiting the use of corporal punishment as well as to preventing early pregnancies…."

Syrian Arab Republic

(24 January 1997, CRC/C/15/Add.70, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 17 and 28)

"The Committee is concerned at the lack of appropriate measures to combat and prevent ill-treatment and abuse within the family and to provide physical and psychological recovery and social reintegration to children victims of such ill-treatment and abuse, and at the lack of information provided on this matter. The Committee also notes with concern that disciplinary measures in schools often consist of corporal punishment although it is prohibited by law.

"The Committee recommends that special attention be paid by the authorities to the problem of ill-treatment and abuse of children within the family and of corporal punishment in schools. In this regard, the Committee stresses the need for information and education campaigns to prevent and combat the use of any form of physical or mental punishment within the family or in schools, as well as for the establishment of a complaint mechanism intended to benefit children victims of such ill-treatment or abuse."

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