Committee on the Rights of the Child, session 25 (2000)

Recommendations/observations on corporal punishment in the Committee on the Rights of the Child's concluding observations to states examined in the 25th session

Burundi

(16 October 2000, CRC/C/15/Add.133, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 40 and 41)

"The Committee is concerned that corporal punishment continues to be practised at home and in some schools and that domestic legislation does not prohibit its use.

"The Committee recommends that the State party take all appropriate measures, including legislation, information campaigns and the promotion of alternative forms of sanctions which respect the physical and mental integrity of children, to end corporal punishment within the family, schools, juvenile justice and alternative care."

Central African Republic

(18 October 2000, CRC/C/15/Add.138, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 44 and 45)

"The Committee is concerned at incidents of police brutality and corporal punishment committed against children, notably in Bangui.

"The Committee recommends that the State party end all acts of violence against children, including corporal punishment, committed by, among others, members of the police forces. The Committee also recommends that the State party provide child rights training programmes for police and detention officials."

Comoros

(23 October 2000, CRC/C/15/Add.141, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 31 and 32)

"Concern is expressed at the insufficient awareness regarding the harmful consequences of ill-treatment and abuse of children, including sexual abuse, both within and outside the family. While aware that the draft family code aims at the protection of the dignity of the child, the Committee is concerned that the practice of corporal punishment in the home is socially and legally accepted, particularly for boys. The practice of corporal punishment in Koranic schools is also a matter of concern.

"The Committee recommends that the State party take effective measures, to prevent and combat child abuse and ill-treatment of children within the family, at school and in other institutions, and in society at large. Furthermore, educational programmes should be established to combat traditional attitudes in society regarding this issue. In particular, the Committee recommends that the State party include in its legislation a specific prohibition on the use of corporal punishment within the family and at school. The Committee encourages the State party to consider seeking to this effect international cooperation from, inter alia, UNICEF and international non-governmental organizations."

Finland

(16 October 2000, CRC/C/15/Add.132, Concluding observations on second report, paras. 39 and 40)

"Although the State party was the second State in the world to prohibit all corporal punishment of children in the family in its Child Custody and Rights of Access Act of 1983, the Committee is concerned at the number of cases of violence against children, including sexual abuse in their homes. It also regrets the lack of information on this phenomenon.

"The Committee recommends that the State party consider taking additional measures to prevent and, where this has not been possible, to identify in a timely manner instances of violence against children within families, to intervene at an early stage, and to develop child-friendly programmes and services for prevention, treatment and rehabilitation with personnel specially trained to work with children."

Marshall Islands

(16 October 2000, CRC/C/15/Add.139, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 36 and 37)

"The Committee is concerned that the use of corporal punishment within the family, schools, other institutions, and generally within society is not expressly prohibited by law.

"In light of articles 19, 28 (2) and 37 of the Convention, the Committee recommends that the State party adopt appropriate legislative measures to prohibit the use of any form of corporal punishment within the family, schools and other institutions. It also encourages the State party to develop measures to raise awareness about the negative effects of corporal punishment and ensure that alternative forms of discipline are administered in families, schools and other institutions in a manner consistent with the child’s dignity and in conformity with the Convention."

Slovakia

(23 October 2000, CRC/C/15/Add.140, Concluding observations on initial report, para. 32)

"In light of articles 19 and 39 of the Convention, the Committee recommends that the State party ensure that all forms of physical and mental violence, including corporal punishment and sexual abuse of children in the family, schools and care institutions, are prohibited. Attention should be given to ensuring that the abused child is not victimized in legal proceedings; strengthening programmes for the rehabilitation and reintegration of abused children; and addressing sociocultural barriers that inhibit victims from seeking assistance. The Committee recommends that the State party continue to undertake public education campaigns about the negative consequences of ill-treatment of children, including within the family. The Committee encourages the State party to continue to promote the use of the hotline and other mechanisms to receive complaints throughout the country; to use the disaggregated data collected as a basis for designing preventive and other measures; and to evaluate progress in this area."

Tajikistan

(23 October 2000, CRC/C/15/Add.136, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 28, 29, 34 and 35)

"The Committee is concerned at numerous and continuing reports of ill-treatment of persons under the age of 18 by the militia, including psychological intimidation, corporal punishment and torture. The Committee is also concerned that victims of such treatment are largely from vulnerable groups, such as children living and/or working on the streets; and that fear of reprisals and inadequate complaints procedures discourage children and their parents from filing complaints.

"In the light of article 37 of the Convention and the Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials, adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 34/169 of 17 December 1979, the State party should take all necessary and effective steps to prevent incidents of ill-treatment by law enforcement officials. The Committee recommends that the State party provide the militia with training on how to deal with persons under the age of 18; ensure that persons are adequately informed of their rights when they are detained; ensure that complaints procedures are simplified so that responses are appropriate, timely, child-friendly and sensitive to victims; and provide rehabilitative support to victims.

"The Committee is concerned at the incidence of ill-treatment of children in the family, in institutions and in school. The Committee is also concerned that violence against women is a problem in Tajikistan and that this has harmful consequences on children.

"In the light of articles 19 and 39 of the Convention, the Committee recommends that the State party ensure that all forms of physical and mental violence, including corporal punishment and sexual abuse, against children in the family, in schools and in care institutions are prohibited. The Committee recommends that measures to that effect be accompanied by public education campaigns about the negative consequences of ill-treatment of children. The Committee recommends that the State party promote positive, non-violent forms of discipline as an alternative to corporal punishment, especially in the home and schools…."

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