Committee on the Rights of the Child, session 27 (2001)

Recommendations/observations on corporal punishment in the Committee on the Rights of the Child's concluding observations to states examined in the 27th session

Bhutan

(9 July 2001, CRC/C/15/Add.157, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 40 and 41)

"Noting the respect for children in Bhutan, the Committee is concerned that there is insufficient information and awareness of the ill-treatment of children in schools and within the family.

"The Committee recommends that the State party: ...

b) take legislative measures to prohibit all forms of physical and mental violence, including corporal punishment and sexual abuse of children in the family, schools, and in institutions;

c) carry out public education campaigns about the negative consequences of ill-treatment of children, and promote positive, non-violent forms of discipline as an alternative to corporal punishment...."

Denmark

(10 July 2001, CRC/C/15/Add.151, Concluding observations on second report, para. 6)

"The Committee notes with satisfaction that in 1997, the right of parents to use corporal punishment on their children was abolished by law. The Committee expresses further satisfaction at the nationwide awareness raising campaign undertaken to inform parents about the new legislation. The Committee notes the efforts to include material in minority languages as a follow-up to the campaign."

DR Congo

(9 July 2001, CRC/C/15/Add.153, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 38 and 39)

"In the context of article 19 of the Convention the Committee is concerned that the corporal punishment of children is permitted under domestic legislation and continues to be practised in State institutions, including schools and places of detention, and in the family.

"The Committee recommends that the State party take all appropriate measures, including of a legislative nature, to prohibit and eliminate all forms of corporal punishment in schools and in homes. The Committee further suggests that awareness raising and education campaigns be conducted to change public attitudes and ensure that alternative forms of discipline are administered in a manner consistent with the child’s human dignity and in conformity with the Convention, especially articles 19 and 28.2."

Monaco

(8 June 2001, CRC/C/15/Add.158, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 26 and 27)

"The Committee is concerned that corporal punishment is not prohibited under law.

"The Committee recommends that the State party prohibit the practice of corporal punishment in the family and conduct information campaigns targeting, among others, parents, children, law enforcement and judicial officials and teachers, explaining children’s rights in this regard and encouraging the use of alternative forms of discipline in a manner consistent with the child’s human dignity and in conformity with the Convention, especially articles 19 and 28.2."

Turkey

(9 July 2001, CRC/C/15/Add.152, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 47 and 48)

"The Committee expresses its deep concern that physical punishment in the home is culturally and legally accepted and that only ‘excessive punishment’ resulting in physical injury is prohibited by the Penal Code. It also notes with concern that, although prohibited, corporal punishment is used in schools and other institutions.

"In the light of articles 3, 19 and 28(2) of the Convention, the Committee encourages the State party to develop measures to raise awareness on the harmful effects of corporal punishment and promote alternative forms of discipline in families, to be administered in a manner consistent with the child’s dignity and in conformity with the Convention. It also recommends that the ban on corporal punishments in school and other institutions be enforced effectively."

United Republic of Tanzania

(9 July 2001, CRC/C/15/Add.156, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 38, 39 and 67)

"The Committee notes with regret that the law does not prohibit the use of corporal punishment as a sentence for children and youth in the juvenile justice system. Concern is also expressed that this type of punishment continues to be practised in schools, families and care institutions.

"The Committee recommends that the State party take legislative measures to prohibit all forms of physical and mental violence, including corporal punishment within the juvenile justice system, schools and care institutions as well as in families. The Committee encourages the State party to intensify its public awareness campaigns to promote positive, participatory, non-violent forms of discipline as an alternative to corporal punishment at all levels of society.

"The Committee recommends that the State party: ...

e) abolish corporal punishment as a sentence within the juvenile justice system…."

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