Committee on the Rights of the Child: St Vincent and the Grenadines

Session 074 (2017)

(3 February 2017, CRC/C/VCT/CO/2-3, Concluding observations on second-third report, Advance unedited version, paras. 32, 33, 64 and 65)

“The Committee remains deeply concerned that corporal punishment is legally permitted and widely practised in all the settings.

“With reference to its general comment No. 8 (2006) on corporal punishment, the Committee urges the State party to:

(a) Explicitly prohibit through legislative and administrative provisions the use of corporal punishment in all settings, namely in schools, child care institutions, including early childhood care institutions, alternative care settings, in the home and in the administration of justice;

(b) Sensitize parents, professionals working with children and the public in general to the harm caused by corporal punishment and promote positive, non-violent and participatory forms of child-rearing and discipline;

(c) Seek technical assistance from UNICEF in this regard, including on the Child Friendly School programming.

“The Committee notes that laws on administration of juvenile justice are currently under revision which is expected to be completed in 2018. The Committee is concerned that:

(c) The Corporal Punishment of Juveniles Act has not been amended and allows the caning of children who have been found guilty of crime;

“In the light of its general comment No. 10 (2007) on children’s rights in juvenile justice, the Committee urges the State party to bring its juvenile justice system fully into line with the Convention and other relevant standards through the process of the ongoing harmonization process. In particular, the Committee urges the State party to:

(a) Facilitate the adoption by the Parliament of the Child Justice Bill (OECS Model Bill) which defines children as those under 18 years of age and sets the minimum age for criminal responsibility at 12 years of age;

(b) Enact legislation explicitly prohibiting life imprisonment without release or parole and corporal punishment as a sentence for any offence committed while the offender was under 18 years of age and regularly review the sentences imposed upon children under 18 years of age for early release”

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Session 030 (2002)

(13 June 2002, CRC/C/15/Add.184, Concluding observations on initial report, paras. 28, 29, 52 and 53)

"The Committee is deeply concerned that corporal punishment is widely practised in schools, in the administration of justice, in other institutions and within the family, and that it is regulated by law and used against children from an early age.

"The Committee recommends that the State party urgently:

a) prohibit through legislative and administrative provisions the use of corporal punishment in all contexts, including in schools, in the administration of justice, in other institutions and within the family;

b) make use of information and education campaigns to sensitize parents, professionals working with children and the public in general to the harm caused by corporal punishment and to the importance of alternative, nonviolent, forms of discipline, as provided for in article 28.2 of the Convention.

"While recognizing the State party’s efforts in this domain the Committee remains concerned that:

h) the Corporal Punishment of Juveniles Act allows for the caning of juveniles who have been found guilty of crime.

"The Committee recommends that the State party:

f) urgently prohibit the corporal punishment of children in the context of the juvenile justice system…."

Read more from Session 030 (2002)
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