Human Rights Committee, session 90 (2007)

Recommendations/observations on corporal punishment in the Human Rights Committee's concluding observations to states examined in session 90 (9-27 July 2007)

Grenada

(14 August 2009, CCPR/C/GRD/CO/1, Concluding observations in the absence of a report, para. 11)

"The Committee is concerned that corporal punishment, including flogging and whipping, is still administered in Grenada in accordance with the Criminal Code, the Prisons Act, and the Education Act of 2002. Particularly worrisome is the whipping of boys as a criminal punishment, and the use of corporal punishment in schools. The Committee further expresses its concern that the law provides for the sentencing of women and girls to solitary confinement in lieu of corporal punishment (arts. 7, 10 and 24).

The State party should immediately eliminate corporal punishment from its law and prohibit its use in places of detention and in schools, as well as in any other institution. Judicial sentences of solitary confinement should not be resorted to."

South Sudan

(29 August 2007, CCPR/C/SDN/CO/3, Concluding observations on third report, para. 10, recommendations made before South Sudan achieved independence)

"The Committee notes with concern the scale of values applied to punishment in the State party’s legislation. It considers that corporal punishment including flogging and amputation is inhuman and degrading. The Committee also notes with concern the continued practice of, and legislation concerning, diya (blood money)."

Sudan

(29 August 2007, CCPR/C/SDN/CO/3, Concluding observations on third report, para. 10, recommendations made before South Sudan achieved independence)

"The Committee notes with concern the scale of values applied to punishment in the State party’s legislation. It considers that corporal punishment including flogging and amputation is inhuman and degrading. The Committee also notes with concern the continued practice of, and legislation concerning, diya (blood money) which may be paid in exchange for less severe punishment (arts. 2, 7, 10 and 14 of the Covenant).

The State party should abolish all forms of punishment that are in breach of articles 7 and 10 of the Covenant. It should also review the practice of the payment of diya (blood money) for murder and similar crimes. The State party should also ensure that sentences are proportional to the crimes and offences committed."

Zambia

(9 August 2007, CCPR/C/ZMB/CO/3/, Concluding observations on third report, paras. 6 and 22)

"The Committee welcomes the abolition of corporal punishment by amendments to the Penal Code, the Criminal Procedure Code, the Prisons Act and the Education Act.

"The Committee remains concerned at information according to which the legal recognition of the rights of parents and teachers to administer punishment on children brings confusion and jeopardizes their full protection against ill-treatment. It is further concerned that corporal punishment is still widely practised on children. (articles 7 and 24)

The State party should prohibit all forms of violence against children wherever it occurs, including corporal punishment in the schools, and undertake public information efforts with respect to appropriate protection of children from violence."

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